Category: Appetizer

Lacy Latkes Tips & Tricks!

I’ll admit that I’m the first one to trash up latkes and have fun with them, but really, nothing competes with the classic perfect latke – if you get them right! There’s an art to the perfect potato latke, and I like to call them LACY LATKES for the shards of potato that crunch up between your teeth like crispy potato sticks! So how do you make these little bites of heaven? Read on!

• Use russet potatoes, they’re perfectly starchy!
• Place your potatoes in water until ready to grate so they don’t brown.
• Prep all your ingredients so that you can work fast!
• Alternate your potato and onion when you grate them, it keeps the mixture white!
• Grate your potatoes from top to bottom (or sideways in the food processor) for longer strands of potato = lacy edges!
• Squeeze your potato/onion mixture as dry as you can! Squeeze into a bowl so you can reserve the starch.
• Once the starch settles to the bottom of the bowl, discard the remaining liquid, and add the starch back in to the latke mixture for extra crispiness!
• Use a heavy bottomed skillet or cast iron pan.
• Add a carrot to your oil, it will keep it clean!
• Use plenty of oil, and get it nice and hot before adding the batter.
• Use a 1/4 cup measuring cup to scoop out the batter and flatten it out with the bottom of the measuring cup, so the edges spread out.
• Don’t overcrowd your pan, give the latkes plenty of room so they don’t steam.
• Leave the latkes alone! Don’t touch and let them develop a good crust! Flip and give the other side some time too!
• If the latke mixture starts to get soggy, give it a squeeze before adding it to the pan.
• Place the latkes on a rack set over a baking sheet to keep them crispy.

So you’ve made the perfect latke, now how do you top them? I put a Questions box on Instagram and here are some of the fun toppings that came in!

Sweet Chili Sauce
Sugar! (who knew?!)
Applesauce MIXED with sour cream!
Sour cream mixed with horseradish
Ketchup (!!!!!)
Tuna & melted cheese a la tuna melt!
Spicy tuna and spicy mayo
Truffle aioli
Sour Cream, pickled onions, capers
Poached egg (yes please!)
Cheddar cheese sauce
Beef fry and coleslaw
Labneh with garlic, dried mint, olive oil, Aleppo pepper
Garlic Mayo and shredded BBQ chicken or pulled beef
Cranberry Sauce
Greek Yogurt, Lox, Dill
Pastrami and sautéed onion
Sriracha
Guacamole
Tzatziki
Ranch Dip
Caviar and creme fraiche

Other Latke Recipes:

crispy rice latkes
salami potato latkes
sabich latkes
falatkes (falafel latkes)
poutine latkes
confetti latkes
butternut squash latkes
cheese latkes

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Halloumi Fries

Well it’s been just about 8 weeks since my last pre-Passover blog post, which means the holiday of dairy delights, Shavuot, is upon us. I’ve traveled to Prague, Berlin and London in that time and while I was able to put many feathers in my traveling cap, I am tired.

In between traveling, I’ve been editing and re-editing the manuscript for my upcoming cookbook, so when it comes to cooking, I’m a bit burnt out creatively! I’ve been drawing a lot of inspiration from my trips, like these Halloumi Fries which they sold in Camden Market in London, and I was determined to try them.

Halloumi is like a cross between feta and mozzarella, and the benefit of this cheese is that you can fry it! It’s delicious doused in all types of sauces (I had an amazing honey sriracha version at Kanteen in London) – but this Middle Eastern take really appealed to my tastes.

I don’t know what I loved better about making these – getting back behind the camera, and styling the shot or getting to eat it for lunch! I miss blogging and wish I had more time for it these days – but thank you for always coming back here and supporting BIB, I appreciate you!

Wishing you a Chag Sameach! XOXO

Related Recipes:

halloumi waffles with tomato jam and balsamic syrup
Greek salad with feta croutons
camembert en croute salad
brie marsala pizza

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Salami Spaghetti

Once upon a time, in a land far far away, there was a Jewish blogger who happened upon a little-know-custom of eating salami on Purim since it’s hung, like the evil Haman was hanged on the gallows. She loved to celebrate the holidays with fun spins on traditions but salami was knows to give her nightmares.

When she was a girl, said blogger was forced to eat salami sandwiches on Friday afternoons, which she promptly threw down the incinerator chute of her apartment building, horrified by the hard white pieces in the salami. She swore off the cured sausage forever.

As a young bridge, not knowing how to cook, and on a newlywed budget, she was introduced to the humble dish of salami and eggs. She learned, that once cooked, the “hard white pieces” in the salami, rendered out into flavorful fat that crisped up the salami into crunchy bits of deliciousness. Intrigued, she hopped on board the salami wagon.

And so, each year, as an ode to her transformation, she puts a spin on salami dishes for the holiday. There was no outdoing her drunken hasselback salami, which has since graced the tables of thousands of Jewish households and deli counters worldwide.

….And now back to first person, I am spellbound that I have carried on this tradition for TEN YEARS here on the blog!! I couldn’t be more proud! This year, my salami inspiration comes by way of Italy, a trip that continues to inspire my cooking on the daily.

Italy is known for it’s pasta, but equally for it’s charcuterie, including salami. This flavorful yet humble dish, marries a garlicky tomato sauce with spicy chili flakes, and rich salami chunks that get crisped up to perfection. Truly worthy of your holiday feast!

In true Italian style, this recipe makes use of the salty and starchy pasta water to build the sauce, so make sure not to drain it and read the full recipe before proceeding!

Happy Purim!!

Other Salami Recipes:

last year: roasted antipasto salad
two years ago: salami nduja
three years ago: salami tarte tatin
four years ago: salami potato latkes
five years ago: salami babka
six years ago: salami quiche
seven years ago: beer battered salami chips with beer mustard
eight years ago: drunken hasselback salami
nine years ago: salami chips

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Shaved Brussels Sprout Salad

Gosh, it has been FOREVER. I almost feel like opening with a HELLO WORLD post, like I did in my very first blog post ever. Does anyone even blog anymore?

Well, in an Instagram poll recently, it turns out that people don’t go to blogs as much, although quite a number of you mentioned that you do, indeed, visit the blog, for all the oldiebutgoodies and just to search for recipes with ingredients you have on hand.


Also, the holidays. So many of you visit on the holidays. THANK YOU!!

Speaking of holidays, I hope you had a wonderful one all around. I did not manage to get over here with a Chanukah post. I even missed my 10 year blogoversary. That was a big one. LIFE. It’s hectic these days.

In case you haven’t heard, I was busy wrapping up the manuscript for book #2, so things have been hectic over here. Lots and lots of recipe testing, but sadly none that I can share. It’s been stressful, and taxing, but OH. SO. DELICIOUS. I cannot wait till you all get to cook from it! March 2023 baby!!

In the meantime, I’ve been on a salad kick. Actually more of a SELF CARE kick. My salad making has been more about NOURISHING than feeding myself and the results have been so worthwhile.

And now I get to share the amazing results with you because this salad is everything you want in one: SWEET, SALTY, TANGY, SPICY AND SMOKY!!! Can I get an amen???? Pass the brussels sprouts!

 

Related Recipes:

kale crunch salad
holiday salad
waldorf salad

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Sukkah Onigiri

One of my kids is obsessed with sushi. You might call him a sushi monster. He’s 7 and he makes his own avocado rolls because he just loves it that much. Every Friday, when I shop for Shabbat, i buy him a sushi roll for lunch and he devours it.

Sushi salad is also a staple in our house. Especially when I have leftover cooked salmon or kani. Sushi salad is a real #oldiebutgoodie around here, and I’ve since adapted the recipe so many times!

These days, our favorite is layered sushi rice, flaked salmon, kani, julienned carrots, julienned cucumbers, edamame, sesame seeds, french fried onions, and a generous drizzle of sweet sauce and spicy mayo. Every time I serve it for Shabbos lunch, the guests go gaga all over again – and I often set up a build-your-own-bowl on a lazy Susan so everyone can make their own.

When it comes to Sukkot, “Sushi in the Sukkah” is a favorite theme of mine, and not just because I like alliteration! I’m all for any meal in a bowl and sushi is really so filling, it makes the perfect lunch.

Years ago, I made these onigiri hamantaschen here on the blog, and the other night, this fun Sukkah idea came to me. I couldn’t be happier with how they turned out! Of course my sushi-loving son started building tons of different Sukkot out of the leftover sushi rice – he pressed some into a ice cube tray to make a 3D version and then topped it off with mashed avocado and a nori “door”. And then he ate them, of course. I took the leftovers and made some of these for breakfast the next morning – a very happy and sushi loving family indeed!

Happy Sushi in the Sukkah!!!

 


sushi salad
Asian kani bites
sushi hamantaschen
snowman sushi

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